advice for newbie

What are the most suitable boards/sails/wetsuits...

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ScottB
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advice for newbie

Post by ScottB » Sun Feb 24, 2013 19:53

Hi,

I'm new to windsurfing after learning during fantastic 2 weeks with Neilson last Sep.

I'm planning on taking a few trips over to here http://www.gwent-adventures.co.uk/ and hiring for a while, but would really like to pick up my own gear at some point this year.

I'd say I'm an early intermediate after learning with neilson and a trip to Rutland water. Not quite planing yet, but comfortable getting up wind and tacking and gybing.

I came across this package http://www.surfstore.co.uk/starboard-ri ... -3136.html and was wondering if this could be a good starting set up for me, or should I aim for some 2nd hand kit from ebay?

any advise would be appreciated.

Cheers,

Scott

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Graham_U
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Re: advice for newbie

Post by Graham_U » Tue Feb 26, 2013 11:02

From what I've seen the Rio is very much a beginning board, which is fine for how you describe your levels. But if you get hooked you will soon outgrow it. Whilst a rig package is often good value, for a board its better to get something secondhand to start with and you will be less concerned if you ding it. Save the money for when you get to an intermediate board.

Had a quick look at Windy World site, and they do a similar offer, which if you join the club you get 10%+ off.
http://www.windsurfersworld.com/index.p ... Itemid=180
Graham

ScottB
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Re: advice for newbie

Post by ScottB » Wed Feb 27, 2013 14:20

Ok, thanks for the advice. I've got my eye on a few likely looking boards on eBay at the moment so fingers crossed.

I do intend to join nomads. I just want to get a few uk sessions under my belt, then sort some kit so I can realistically join you without having to worry about hiring etc.

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dro
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Re: advice for newbie

Post by dro » Thu Feb 28, 2013 17:55

As someone who barely got past beginner I would definately recomend NOT buying your first kit new.

If you are anyything like me your improving skills and especially your ego will demand a smaller brighter coloured board very soon, so you can go and play with your new friends with your head held high (just before you go arse over tip on your new small board)

I would also recommend a deck chair,a lot of lager and some red paint!!
But that is another story

Neilson is also a very good move and I intend to visit at least twice this year now that I am a warm water sailor.Their instruction and kit are excellent value for money.Unfortunately I seem to be watching more than doing these days but I still dream

Lord Timid
What do you mean not ENOUGH wind ?

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dro
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Re: advice for newbie

Post by dro » Thu Feb 28, 2013 17:57

By the way why have the little pictures changed sides ?
Is it something to do with the rotation of the earth and our position in relation to the equator?

LT
What do you mean not ENOUGH wind ?

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Poole Windsurfing
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Re: advice for newbie

Post by Poole Windsurfing » Fri Mar 01, 2013 18:19

Hi Scott,

As mentioned by others, definitely don't bother buying from new for your first windsurfing setup.
Progress is quick now a days (with the correct modern equipment) and you would soon out grow the board/rig you learn the basics on!

For second hand, the Poole Windsurfing School sells off last years kit before the start of each new summer season, much at around half the RRP.
Take a look at the second hand list here:

http://www.poolewindsurfing.co.uk/speci ... equipment/

Maybe there is something that takes your fancy?
Poole Windsurfing - Lessons & Hire
Phone: 01202 237247
Email: info@poolewindsurfing.co.uk
Web: www.poolewindsurfing.co.uk

Ian H
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Re: advice for newbie

Post by Ian H » Sun Mar 10, 2013 15:20

Scott

Unless you have vast sums of money I would consider one of the following:

Hifly Magnum 323
Bic Veloce 328
Fanatic Snake 335
F2 Phoenix 320

They were the first of the wider and shorter style of boards (although not as wide or as short as todays beginner boards) to learn on and still okay for this purpose today. With maybe the exception of the F2 Phoenix, you can pick these boards up for next to nothing. Do not go for anything older than these.

I myself have a Hifly Magnum 323, heavy as hell but still gets on the plane early and turns quite nicely for such a big board. I bought this originally for my wife to learn on. Because it is now not worth anything I have kept it just incase any of my work colleagues wanted to give windsurfing a go.

If you managed to buy one of the boards above they should see you through the 1st year as you progress and then if you wanted to sell on you should get your money back.

Some of my fellow Nomads may not totally agree as they all know I do like a bargain (a bit of an understatement maybe), but I do think you would not be dissapointed with any of the above boards.

Red paint is optional, you will have to check out the Mountain bike section as to why. Me personally for maritine purposes a better investment would be some green paint.

Whatever you decide I hope you stick at it, it is a great sport and the better you get the more you enjoy it, just look at all the old wrinklies still doing it.

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Graham_U
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Re: advice for newbie

Post by Graham_U » Mon Mar 11, 2013 09:53

Be warned, Ian likes old school boards which by modern standards are challenging. also those boards are probably pitched a bit higher than your current level. The new wider boards from the early 2000s onwards are much more stable and easier to get to a comfortable level.
Graham

Ian H
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Re: advice for newbie

Post by Ian H » Wed Mar 13, 2013 17:40

Scott

My view: top tip - the RYA instructional dvd’s would be a very good investment. I found them very helpful indeed when I was learning (and still do). If you become a club member, I am not too sure but I think they hold the dvd’s for people to borrow.

I do totally agree with Graham, for the beginner they will definitely not be as easy to learn on as the wider and shorter boards of today. Graham is right I do mostly sail older style boards but I fully acknowledge how modern boards make it easier for people to learn.

If money is not an issue then please ignore every thing I have said and what I am about to say, but if it is, you can still get out there and enjoy yourself and have just as much fun if you know what to buy.

I still stand by my view that if you are already of the standard of being able to flare gybe and tack with no problems, you would have few issues with the boards I mentioned (a bit wobbly at first maybe). They are all around 185 litres in volume with more width and stability than the previous generation beginner boards.

Back in the late 90s my wife wanted to learn, so at that time I bought a Bic Veloce 328. After about half a dozen sessions she could go back and forth with even the odd tack thrown in. So these boards are not that difficult to use. Unfortunately she decided she did not want to continue with windsurfing so I sold the board. A few years later she expressed a wish to give it another try, so I bought the Hifly. The Hifly is actually a slightly wider so slightly easier to use. Both however are still very useable today.

It is not my intention to put you off windsurfing by putting you on a board that is too hard to sail. The boards I quote are quite suitable for learning, even today. I also would not want to put you off windsurfing by telling you you need to spend vast sums of money, because you definitely do not.

It was very challenging for me all those years ago learning on a 4m board no wider than a modern wave board and also having a rounded bottom that made it very tippy. However the boards I quote are nothing like that.

You would be most welcome to give my Hifly Magnum 323 a try if you like. They were still using these in many teaching centres just 10 years ago.
One added bonus with this board is that it is made out of polypropylene and almost indestructible and totally impervious to catapults. Something that is a welcome feature in the early stages but as I have said before it is very heavy.

It obviously depends on your budget but you can pick one of these up for far less than £50 now (I paid £50 and that was 6 or 7 years ago).

Hopefully depending on your dedication you would probably want to change to a smaller and sportier board by the end of the summer anyway.

I may have started a bit of a debate here.

Ian H
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Re: advice for newbie

Post by Ian H » Wed Mar 20, 2013 22:09

Scott

You could do far worse than this F2 Phoenix 320 on E-bay:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/121084383603? ... 1423.l2649

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